Archive for April 2019

Charmaine Crawford, 24, of Laverock Road, has pleaded not guilty in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court to breaching an intervention order, resisting police and behaving in an offensive manner.A WARRNAMBOOL mother fighting police charges can be clearly heard in the background of a triple 0 call yelling and screaming before officers arrived at her home.
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Charmaine Crawford, 24, of Laverock Road, has pleaded not guilty in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court to breaching an intervention order, resisting police and behaving in an offensive manner.

Ms Crawford has been the subject of an intervention order, banning her from engaging in domestic violence while in the presence of her eight-month-old son.

On June 30 last year her partner called police saying there was an IVO in place, she was “going nuts”, highly anxious, yelling and swearing and stopping cars in the street.

Senior Constable Emmeline McKinnon said when police arrived Ms Crawford could be heard yelling and screaming obscenities from the Laverock Road home.

She said Ms Crawford’s partner had their eight-month-old son in his arms while she had barricaded herself behind a cot. She was alleged to have repeatedly sworn and told police to get out of her home.

Ms Crawford then locked herself in a bedroom and police forced open the bedroom door.

Senior Constable McKinnon determined there had been family violence in the home, with Ms Crawford as the aggressor and told her she was being detained in custody.

Once placed in the back of a divisional van, Senior Constable McKinnon said Ms Crawford made obscene and highly offensive comments, which continued at the police station.

The case will continue before magistrate Peter Mellas later this month.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

THE issue of parents taking their children out of school for a family holiday has raised the ire of Leader readers.
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The education department has changed the rules for these scenarios with a crackdown on temporary leave.

Many of our readers believe it’s Big Brother gone too far and the department should keep its nose out of family business.

We all know families who have hit the road with their kids in tow for amonth-long, two-month, evensix-month adventure holiday.

These parents will tell you their children learn a great deal from these kinds of trips.

There may not be a lot of formal grammar and maths lessons, but for the young, life experience – meeting new people, seeing how other people live, learning about different places – is just as valuable.

Taking a child out for a block of time once in a while is a lot different, too, from parents who can’t be bothered sending their kids to school. This is negligence of the highest order and should not be tolerated in any form.

And perhaps the age of the child also has some bearing on this debate.

Taking a student in the upper levels of high school away for an extended period is a different story to a young child in primary school, but it could be argued parents have enough sense to appreciate this distinction.

Maybe the department would argue the cost of school holiday accommodation is no justification for taking kids out during term, but in this day and age it’s a reality, particularly for a larger family.

For some, the economics simply can’t be ignored.

There are also times when parents’ and childrens’ holidays just don’t mesh.

So, for the sake of spending some time away as a family, a school absense is necessary.

Kids are kids for what can seem like the blink of an eye, and families are together under the one roof for a comparitively short time.

The family holiday is something to cherish, and sometimes it’s just not possible for this to span a school holiday break.

Responsible parents should not be discouraged from giving this kind of gift to their kids.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

AUSTRALIA is at risk of “losing the battle” against family violence, says Member for Mallee Andrew Broad.
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Rosie Batty and Andrew Broad.

He said he was alarmed to learn two women a week were killed by partners or former partners in Victoria, and something needed to change.

Mr Broad was not alone in his concern, as Australian of the Year and passionate anti-family violence campaigner Rosie Batty addressed more than 40 parliamentarians in Canberra on Monday night.

The Nationals’ MP helped facilitate the forum on family violence as part of his role on the Parliamentarians Against Family Violencecommittee.

He said “you could have heard a pin drop” as Ms Batty, whose son Luke was killed by his father Greg Anderson last year, told her story and urged MPs not to blame the victims of domestic violence.

“Rosie didn’t take a backward step – she was pretty clear about what she thinks needs to happen,” Mr Broad said.

“Seventeen to 19-year-olds’ attitudes toward women with respect to violence are declining, not improving, which is a worry. We’vegot a long way to go.”

For more of this story, purchase your copy of Wednesday’s Sunraysia Daily 04/03/2015.To subscribe to our Digital Edition Click here

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Malachy Legg, 29, of Princes Highway, pleaded guilty in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court to the charge which breached a suspended jail sentence.A PORT Fairy man with an extensive criminal record has been jailed for a fortnight after failing to have an alcohol interlock device on his car.
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Malachy Legg, 29, of Princes Highway, pleaded guilty in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court to the charge which breached a suspended jail sentence.

He was jailed for seven days and on the breach of suspended sentence will serve 14 days. The sentences will run concurrently.

Legg was stopped at a booze bus site along the Princes Highway at Warrnambool on July 13 last year, where a driver’s licence check revealed he had an alcohol interlock condition on his licence for three years.

There was no alcohol interlock device fitted to his car.

After sentencing yesterday, Legg appealed against the severity of the penalty and was released on bail until an appeal hearing in the Warrnambool County Court.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Sometimes you’ve just got to have fun.
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When The Mercury heard about a global competition to get our city’s name on an icon of our culture – the Monopoly board – we got excited.

How good would it be to sit down to a game of Monopoly and see Maitland right there on the map?

We dreamt up a scheme to contact people in other cities called Maitland around the world and enlist them to the cause. We were given a chance to spruik this on national television.

We’ve been on phones, social media and email to unite Maitlands of the globe. And today we bring you the news that Maitland, South Australia, had embraced the cause.

And be warned – we aren’t finished yet.

Why are we so interested? And why has this campaign attracted global attention?

If you’re reading this, there’s every chance the game has featured somewhere in your life.

Have you ever heard a final verdict punctuated with the words: “Do not pass GO, do not collect $200”? Have you referred to a “Get Out of Jail Free” card when you’ve found a way to get yourself off the hook?

Monopoly has probably seen you through rainy afternoons and hours of anticipation, sprawled on the loungeroom floor with family or friends.

Sure, there were fights over who got to be banker. You probably spat the dummy when you saw someone stealing. And there’s been many a house-rules showdown over the Free Parking kitty.

Monopoly has an indelible place in our culture. It’s the stuff of memories. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our beautiful city was part of that phenomenon in years to come?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.